2018 Wrestling and Cheer Results

The results from the 2018 NCASB Wrestling and Cheer Conference Meet.

Updated Team Score NCASB Wrestling 2018

2018 NCASB Conference Wrestling Brackets

NCASB Outstanding Cheerleader Results 2018

NCASB Cheer Team Results 2018

 

 

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2017 NCASB Track and Field Conference Championship Results

The results from the 2017 NCASB Track and Field Conference Meet.

2017 NCASB Track and Field Results

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2017 NCASB Goalball Championship Results

Below are links to the completed brackets from the 2017 NCASB Goalball Championships.

Girls Goalball Bracket

Boys Goalball Bracket

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1705 Swim Coaches Newsletter

1705  NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER 

Conference Meet Information: Friday April 28, 2017

3:30p –   Teams arrive – Worthington Pool – 400 W Dublin-Granville Rd Worthington Oh 43085

4:00p – Warm-ups – lanes will be assigned after entries are processed.

4:15p – Coaches – Officials meeting – Worthington Pool

5:00p – Start time (timeline will be created once entries are in)

Swimming will take approx. 4 hours (depending on number of swimmers)

Dinner for swimmers will be delivered to the Worthington Pool – Eat at your discretion

Coaches/Volunteers Hospitality food – Hospitality Room

 

Sat April 29, 2017 Schedule of events for Swim Coaches

7:00 a.m. Breakfast – TBA

Swim Coaches meeting  – 9:00a

Business Meeting, Awards presentation & Social – TBA

 

Q & A

Thanks to coaches Barbara French and Paul Ehresman for this week’s questions.

Coach Ehresman: “Things are so chaotic after school in MO with different clubs and activities and forensics occurring at the same time as swim practice that we have not done any dry land workouts at all this year.  In the last few years, though, we used a balance beam out in a stairwell to put kids through a repetitious aerobic workout a la the Harvard Step Test for set periods of time while their teammates swam long distance in the pool….  Brought heartbeats up to a good level on dry land while giving long distance swimmers a chance to actually do their events in our crowded pool.”

Director:   Thanks for this response which actually touches on my two previous questions (dryland and practice efficiency), and, goes a little deeper into the challenges that we all most likely face.

No doubt students have compromises and schedule conflicts they face to be able to participate in a variety of activities.  This justifies being more efficient and creative in our daily workouts to provide a fun and challenging experience that swimmers may find more inviting than other activities.  Your balance beam idea is a great way to increase their HRs.  Bringing it on deck or having aerobic step platforms available is another way to use a station approach to training which keeps the athletes HR up between sets without the crowded lane space.   Jump ropes or just doing simple calisthenics like jumping jacks on deck works very well.

Coach French:  Q. 1) I have a swimmer who lifts his head during the freestyle.  We have tried several things to break the habit.  What are some strategies or drills to help him?

Director:  There are several reasons why swimmers lift their head and seemingly refuse to correct it.  The most common reason is they feel they need to lift their head high enough to assure a good breath of air.   A close second is the need to see where they are going?  If your swimmer is totally blind this may not be the case, however, those with partial sight may be just attempting to safely move up and down the pool.   When bad habits are tied to the most basic survival skills of breathing and mobility they are not easy to break.  Swimming circles in a practice situation is not always comforting especially if they’ve run into someone in the past.

My first bit of advice is to do wall breathing drills – have them hold the wall with one hand with their feet on the bottom.  They’ll bend over and place their face in the water in a proper “neutral” position, then exhale and rotate their head opposite of the hand on the wall keeping the same side ear in the water while inhaling.  Have them repeat this until it’s very comfortable and then switch sides.  Next step is to have them hold the wall with both hands and perform a freestyle arm stroke that begins and ends with the hand on the wall.  Each time the hand passes under the body the head is turned to get a breath.  Make sure they exhale before turning the head to inhale and they keep the opposite side ear in the water.  Repeat on both sides and then with alternating arms.  The next step is to get them horizontal using a pull buoy to support their lower body and a kickboard extended with both arms.  Have them do the same one arm drill using a light kick.  Each time of course getting a breath keeping the opposite side ear in the water.

Coach French:  Q.2)Do others use snorkels in practice?  What are some things that helps?  What “bad” habits does it encourage?

Director:  Hopefully we’ll get some feedback on the amount of snorkel use.  Anyone that has the budget to purchase snorkels for their swimmers or have them purchase them will have a multifaceted tool for stroke improvement.  I’m not aware of any “bad” habits snorkel use encourages; others may have different insight.  My swimmers use snorkels almost every day.  Snorkels are used for two basic reasons – greater efficiency in the breathing mechanism – and head position correction.  Breathing through the long narrow tube requires more energy during the inhalation/exhalation process.  Thus the breathing muscles become stronger and the air exchange process more efficient.  Being able to keep the head in a stable position allows the swimmer to concentrate on proper stroke mechanics without moving the head and upper body during the breathing process within each stroke.  The snorkel pipe acts as a visual indicator (waving flag), for the coach as to whether the head is remaining still during each phase of the stroke.

 

Here’s a question from the Swimming Director?  (Last question for the season).

Q – Are there any special or unique ways that you prepare your swimmers for the conference meet that differ from other meets?  Please, share your experiences with others in the spirit of “rising all the boats!”

A – Submit your input by email to Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com.  I’ll post all results from this question in the next newsletter.

Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

 

Tip of the Week – Test Sets

Test sets are a good way to mark progress throughout the season.  If your particular program is relatively short, test sets might just take the form of a warm-up and a consistent swim that marks the conditioning improvements.  For example; 1 x 400 moderate swim alternating Free and non-Free.  Then, 1 x 400 Free as fast as possible.  You should make sure it’s near the beginning of the workout and the same day of the week each week for consistency.  Test sets can be adjusted for the time available and modified in a number of ways; the key is consistency.

Weekly Workout (Abbreviations are listed at bottom of this page)

Modify each workout (distances, cycles, etc.), to meet the needs and abilities of your swimmers.  Taking time to teach each drill is important.  These workouts assume knowledge of drills.

This would be considered a “taper” workout.  One that you may do the last few days of the season in prep for the conference meet.  You can see the total yardage is considerably less and there are several recovery sets intertwined within the workout.

WU      (100 Sw Free – 100 Dr #1) x 3

K 1 x 200 choice kick w/ 3rd 50 bld to fast

Sw 100 mod – recovery

P1 1 x 200 choice w/ even 25’s speed Scull

Sw 2 x 3 x 50 C 1:00 ri, 2:00 ri, 3:00ri

Each set = 1) mod bld, 2) fast, 3) very fast and broken at 25 for :10

Sw 100 mod – recovery

Sw 4-6 x 25 C 1:00+ emphasis is fast start and great finish (swim or walk back to starting end)

(500 swimmer do 5 x 100 w/ :30 ri, desc 1-3 and hold 4 & 5 as close to goal pace)

Sw 100 mod – recovery

Turn or other technique work (200+/-)

Sw 100+ Warm down – recovery                                                     1800yds

 

Stroke drill(s) of the week – Reaction Drills

Hear is a fun way to train your swimmers to react to the starting sound (beep, whistle, etc.).  Spread them around the deck with plenty of room between swimmers.  You act as the Starter giving them the command, “Take your mark.”  They assume a modified starting position bending at the waist and knees with hands on the deck near their feet.  When you whistle or sound the beep, they clap their hands as quickly as possible.  Repeat this as many times as you want.  If they clap early they’re eliminated as though they false started.  Keep going until you have a winner!  Take this drill to the starting block and repeat.  Just prior to the one where you want them to dive in change the sound!  As in all start drills make sure the movement is one way away from the block for safety.

Here is a fantastic resource for teaching all the basics from USA Swimming. http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/eb0df286-b6e1-45ee-91e3-5216f393541b/Teaching%20the%20Strokes%20to%20Developmental%20Swimmers.pdf

 

Dryland exercise of the week – Elite jumps

“Elite Jumps” are one of the most difficult exercise to do properly.   If you have a swimmer that can do these well you’ve identified a special athlete.  Elite jumps begin with a two foot take-off pulling the knees up to the chest and landing back on both feet in balance.  While in flight (with knees raised to chest) the athlete claps their hands in front of and below their knees.  Once they can do this successfully you want them to chain as many together as possible.  Doing upwards to 4- 6 in row without rest.  It’s been said that if you can do 3 sets of 30 non-stop, with 30 seconds rest between sets you ARE an Elite Athlete.  Good luck!

Nutrition – Easily digestible and familiar

By now you’ve probably planned your weekend’s meals.  Understandably you’re at the mercy of the host school and limits that budget and transportation logistics create.  However, a few things to consider.  First, with the conference meet being the most important meet of the season don’t’ expect or require a major change in the swimmer’s diet.  This is not the time to encourage them to eat unfamiliar or “local” favorites if they’re not comfortable with it.  Eating a little less, but of familiar foods is a better combination than having them consume an unknown.  My rule of thumb for swim meets is nothing leafy and nothing greasy!  Both are difficult to digest and have a longer stomach emptying time.  Keep it simple with the diet these next few days and the body will take care of itself!

 

 

Throughout the season as practices become more advanced these abbreviations will help you understand the workouts a little better:

Codes –

best avg – best effort over entire set,  Bk – Backstroke, Br – Breaststroke, build – increase speed over designated distance, C –cycle,  Catch-up  – overlapping stroke, dol – dolphin kick, DPK -Distance per kick, DPS -Distance per stroke, Dr –Drill, Fl- Butterfly,     fltr – flutter kick, Fr-Freestyle, K –Kick, K-6’s –(K 6 times on alternate sides),  R/L K-6’s (K 6 times for each arm pull remaining on same side for designated distance), P1- Pull w/ pullbouy, P2 – Pull w/ pullbouy and paddles, ri – rest interval,  R/L – right/left, RP Race Pace, Sc – Sculling,  Sw- Swim, LT- lactate tolerance, WU/WD warm-up/warm-down.

 

Jim Peterfish is the Swimming Director of the NCASB and member of USA Swimming National Disability Committee. Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

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Titles and phone numbers for Kansas Coaches

The Kansas Athletic Director is Tim Schierbeck  —  Phone number 913-305-3023.

Track Coach  —  Tim Schierbeck  —  913-305-3023

Track Coack —  Nicole Drake  —  913-305-3023

Goalball Coach  —  Tim Schierbeck  —  913-305-3023

Wrestling Coach  —  Tim Schierbeck  —  913-305-3023

Cheerleading Coach  —  Cheri Stanley  —  913-305-3018

Currently no swimming or forensic coaches.

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1704 Swim Coaches Newsletter

NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER 

Conference Meet Information: Friday April 28, 2017

3:30p –   Teams arrive – registration – Worthington Pool

3:45p – Coaches – Scratch and Officials meeting – Worthington Pool

4:00p – Warm-ups – lanes will be assigned after entries are processed.

5:00p – Start time (timeline will be created once entries are in)

Swimming will take approx. 4 hours (depending on number of swimmers)

Dinner for swimmers will be delivered to the Worthington Pool – Eat at your discretion

Coaches/Volunteers Hospitality food – Hospitality Room

 

Sat April 29, 2017 Schedule of events for Swim Coaches

7:00 a.m. Breakfast – TBA

Swim Coaches meeting  – 9:00a

Business Meeting, Awards presentation & Social – TBA

Meet procedures:   Send Eligibility, Entries, and Sonka Award to Alison and Jim.  (abrewer@ossb.oh.gov) (youthletics@columbus.rr.com)

Eligibility due April 17th 

** Entries requested by April 21st  by noon Central time.   

Entry deadline April 24th at noon Central time.  Any entries received after this time may compete, but, will not receive points or awards. 

Officials – Referee – Eric Schmidt, others

Meet Director – Jim Peterfish

Announcer – Paul Reeder

Computer – Worthington Pools Staff

Timers – Members of the Westerville Aquatic Club HS Training Group

Other Volunteers – Members of the Lions Club

Hospitality by Sharon Shaw

 

John Sonka Award, (http://ncasb.org/sports/ncasb-swimming/sonka-award/) please, be preparing that now.

Q & A

Here’s a question from the Swimming Director?  (I did not receive any responses from anyone on the dryland question, so I’ll pose another :).

Q – Are there any special or unique modifications or adaptations you employ that make your practices more efficient?  Please, share your experiences with others that may be struggling with similar issues.

A – Submit your input by email to Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com.  I’ll post all results from this question in the next newsletter.

Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

 

Tip of the Week

Interval Training – What is it good for?   Interval training, as the name suggests, combines repetitive swims of varying distances with periodic planned rest into sets.   By adjusting the work to rest ratio you have the ability to maximize the effects on each of the energy systems the swimmer uses during races and throughout training bouts.  The two basic systems are aerobic (ability to produce energy from O2) and, anaerobic (the opposite; generating energy without the presence of O2).  Within these two general energy systems there are 3 to 5 bands that can be identified.  To study this in more depth you should consult any exercise physiology book or season planning source.  The subject is too broad for me to do it any justice in a short “Tip of the Week.”  Suffice to say I am old-school and look at the energy systems in 5 bands and create my training plans around these five areas:  Anaerobic Threshold (AT), Max Volume O2 (MVO2), Lactate Tolerance (LT), Sprint/Speed (Sp), Race Pace (RP).

Here is a rule of thumb approach to dividing your workouts.  Over the course of a week you should attempt to average these percentages of effort in your training plans.

40% AT –   10 sec of rest for every minute of continuous exercise.  Set duration 30 min or more.  Example: 15 x 100 C 2:00 swimmer avgs appr. 1:40 per 100 consistent effort over 1500 yds.

25% MVO2 – 60 sec of rest for every minute of continuous exercise.  Set duration 30 min or less.

Example: 4 x 200 C 7:00 swimmer avgs appr. 1:40 per 100(3:20) Best avg effort over each 200

15% LT – 180 sec of rest for every minute of continuous exercise.  Set duration 20 min or less.

Example:  4 x 75 C 5:00 swimmer avgs appr. 1:40 per 100 (1:15) all out to failure effort

10% Sp – 240 sec of rest for every minute of continuous exercise.  Set duration 20 min or less.

Example:  10 x 25 C 1:40 swimmer avgs appr. 1:40 per 100 (:25) all out to failure effort

10% RP – 240+ sec of rest for every minute of continuous exercise.  Set duration 20-30 min.

Example:  4 x 100 C 8:00 swimmer avgs appr. 1:40 per 100 w/ a: 10 sec break at each wall.  Max effort.

Keep in mind that swimming is more anaerobic in nature for most swimmers.  However, training for swimming is an aerobic activity in and of itself.  Therefore, the greater aerobic capacity your swimmers have the more efficient they’ll be when training in an anaerobic state.   It doesn’t matter whether your practices average 1000 yds. or closer to 5000 yds. the percentages remain the same.

 

Weekly Workout (Abbreviations are listed at bottom of this page)

Modify each workout (distances, cycles, etc.), to meet the needs and abilities of your swimmers.  Taking time to teach each drill is important.  These workouts assume knowledge of drills.

WU      200 Sw Free – 200 Sw Back – 100 Sw IM

K 1 x 100 dolphin kick, 2 x 50 [1) Fast fltr, 2) Br K DPK] x 2-3

Sw Free 2 x (5 x 50) mid pool 25’s (see drill of the week) C :15 ri   x1:00ri between sets.

  • Free 2) Back

Sw Fr (aerobic)  4 x 200 (50 mod, 50 bld, 50 fast, 50 to failure)  :45-1:00ri  800 yds

Sw IM Switch  6 x 50  C 2-2:30          1) Fly/Bk, 2) Bk/Fr, 3) Br/Fr   all turns  very fast!

WD Sw 200 +/-                                                                                                     2900 yds

 

Stroke drill(s) of the week – Mid-pool turns

Mid pool turns are just a way of adding an additional turn to the same length distance.  For example; swimming individual 25s a swimmer does not need to perform a turn.  Start and end that same 25 in the middle of the pool and then a turn is required.  For a 50, it would require two turns rather than one, etc.

Here is a fantastic resource for teaching all the basics from USA Swimming. http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/eb0df286-b6e1-45ee-91e3-5216f393541b/Teaching%20the%20Strokes%20to%20Developmental%20Swimmers.pdf

 

Dryland exercise of the week – Right/Left V-ups

Developing the core muscles is very important.  Once your swimmers have the ability to do crunches correctly and are doing so on a regular basis adding V-ups is a great progression.  V-ups are performed by lying prone and lifting both legs and the shoulders off the floor at the same time so that the only body part touching the floor is their buttocks (a “V” position).  This should be done in a squeezing motion not a jerking move.  As a build up to this exercise or for relief during fatigue modify it by lifting only one leg at a time.  Thus, alternating right leg and left leg.  Abdominal muscles recover very quickly, therefore if the swimmer reaches failure they can relax for a minute, or, more and begin the exercise until failure occurs again.

Nutrition

Encourage healthy snacking by promoting milk and dairy products including cheese and yogurt.  These choices are rich in nutrients and offer a source of protein and carbohydrates.  Include fruit and nuts for increased nutritional benefits and personal taste preference.  Healthy snacks replacing “junk” food on a regular basis has a compounding effect on good health.

 

Throughout the season as practices become more advanced these abbreviations will help you understand the workouts a little better:

Codes –

best avg – best effort over entire set,  Bk – Backstroke, Br – Breaststroke, build – increase speed over designated distance, C –cycle,  Catch-up  – overlapping stroke, dol – dolphin kick, DPK -Distance per kick, DPS -Distance per stroke, Dr –Drill, Fl- Butterfly,     fltr – flutter kick, Fr-Freestyle, K –Kick, K-6’s –(K 6 times on alternate sides),  R/L K-6’s (K 6 times for each arm pull remaining on same side for designated distance), P1- Pull w/ pullbouy, P2 – Pull w/ pullbouy and paddles, ri – rest interval,  R/L – right/left, RP Race Pace, Sc – Sculling,  Sw- Swim, LT- lactate tolerance, WU/WD warm-up/warm-down.

 

Jim Peterfish is the Swimming Director of the NCASB and member of USA Swimming National Disability Committee. Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

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Swim Coaches Newsletter

NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER 

Rules:Don’t forget to submit your eligibility sheets to me.  These can sent as combined or in boys/girls format.  If you’re considering submitting someone for the John Sonka Award, (http://ncasb.org/sports/ncasb-swimming/sonka-award/) please, be preparing that now.

Q & A

Here’s a question for the Swimming Director?

Q – What type of dryland exercises do you incorporate into your program?  I’d like to hear what each of the teams are doing to help build strength in their swimmers.

A – Submit your input by email to Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com.  I’ll post all results from this question in the next newsletter.

Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

Note: the NF rule book is available for download  at www.nfhs.org/ebooks  code: SWRB17.

 

 

Tip of the Week

Equipment – What should you have and what are the pros and cons?  The basic pieces of equipment I think each swimmer should have include kickboard, pull-buoy, hand paddles, fins and snorkel.

Kickboard – isolates the legs while providing a little frontal buoyancy.    You can get these very inexpensively and save even more by cutting the regular size boards in half!  Swimmers don’t need a surf board just something to hang on to.  A smaller board allows them to streamline and maintain a proper body position while kicking.

Pull-buoy – isolates the arms while providing buoyancy for the legs.  Again don’t’ get fancy, the basic Styrofoam cylinders attached by rope provides everything you need.  Experiment by adjusting the placement from upper thigh to lower calf and see what this does to their ability to maintain body position and breathing technique.

Hand paddles – I prefer the basic rectangular paddles but some of the more expensive ones can be effective due to their ergonomic fit.  Problem is when you lose one you lose the pair.  If purchasing for a team I would buy the basic.  Experiment with them wearing only one while the other is bare handed.  They’ll be able to contrast the difference in pressure on their palms immediately.

Fins – basic training fins.  Do not use fins designed for snorkeling or scuba diving; they’re too large and not only ineffective, but, potentially placing too much stress on the ankles causing soreness and injury.  Fins are a great way to add “speed” to any set.  Extreme caution should be exercised as they will travel much faster causing a change in their stroke count and posing a risk of running into the wall.  Streamlining or using a “catch-up” stroke is recommended.   Tappers for all swimmers while using fins is a good idea.  Use fins to develop both flutter kick and dolphin kick.

Snorkels – swim training snorkels are very effective in correcting head and body position.  Being able to keep the head in proper alignment without the need to turn or lift the head for a breath allows the swimmer to concentrate on proper stroke or kick patterns for extended periods of time.  Snorkels are relatively expensive ($25-$30) apiece and not something you’ll want your athletes sharing.  Money well spent if you or the athlete can afford them.

Weekly Workout (Abbreviations are listed at bottom of this page)

Modify each workout (distances, cycles, etc.), to meet the needs and abilities of your swimmers.  Taking time to teach each drill is important.  These workouts assume knowledge of drills.                                                 

WU      100 Sw Free – 100 Sw Back – 100 Sw Choice

Streamline drill – 7 -7’s (from ready position streamline a minimum of 7 yards 7 times while holding perfect positon).  Swimmers may walk or swim back in an adjacent lane to keep the flow one way.  (this is the last time I’ll post this as you get the idea it increases incrementally each week.)

K 8 x 25 alt dolphin kick on back with fltr on back x 25’s –  (very tight streamline on back) :05 ri after the first 25 and plus :05 for each thereafter, ( :05, :10, :15, etc.)

Dr Back – 4 x 4 x 50 C :10-:15 ri per 50 and an additional 1:00ri between sets.

Odd 50’s = (25 Fingertip drag(see “Drill of the Week”/25 swim)

Even 50’s = (25 swim DPS/ 25 bld to fast)

Sw Fr (aerobic)  8 x 75 mid 25 is very fast :30 ri per 75 fast.  600 yds

Sw Bk 8 x 25  C 1-2:00        Back start, sprint to wall – all very fast!

WD Sw 200 +/-                                                                                                     2300 yds

Stroke drill(s) of the week – Backstroke Fingertip drag

You may be familiar with the “zipper” or “ride the side” drill in Freestyle.  The swimmer drags their thumb along the side of their body from hip to armpit during the recovery phase.  The Fingertip drag in Backstroke is similar in that you want the hands in close to the body, however, the fingertips are facing up just slightly above the surface as the hand is pushed from ribcage to hip in the propulsive phase of the stroke.

Start with the swimmer on their back, hands down (you can give them a pull buoy for their legs if they require additional buoyancy).  With a light kick the swimmer pumps their hands up and down the side of their torso (high on ribcage to the hips) with more pressure on the downward press keeping their fingers slightly out of the water.  They should push down until the elbow and wrist are fully extended.  Next step is to alternate arms in the same movement.  Next add the same side hip rotating up and out of the way as the swimmer “pumps” alternate arms.  Isolate one arm and add a straight arm recovery having the swimmer bring their hand into their ribcage as quickly as possible.  Remember this is all being done with a “fingertip” drag on the propulsive phase.  Finally, have them do the same motion but with their fingers pointed towards the side wall keeping them under water.  You now have a very functional and efficient backstroker!

Here is a fantastic resource for teaching all the basics from USA Swimming. http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/eb0df286-b6e1-45ee-91e3-5216f393541b/Teaching%20the%20Strokes%20to%20Developmental%20Swimmers.pdf

 

Dryland exercise of the week Windmill Planks

                Planks of any kind if done properly are one of the best exercises for swimmers.  We do them every day and in a variety of styles.  They are one of my favorite exercises because they mimic the horizontal position of the body in the water.  Benefits include increased strength in the shoulder and core areas.  Windmill planks begin in the typical shoulder plank with the hands directly below the shoulders.  Weight is distributed as evenly as possible between the hands/shoulders and the feet.  The swimmer alternates rotating on the supporting shoulder while the opposite hand reaches for the ceiling directly above the swimmer.

 

Nutrition

Swimmers need to refuel with carbohydrates and protein immediately after practice.  If their scheduled meal is more than 20 minutes post practice I would suggest they consume a PowerBar or similar supplement.  Chocolate milk and a peanut butter sandwich is a great recovery snack after a difficult practice.  Proper recovery nutrition will reduce the likelihood of cramping, soreness and fatigue that may carry into the next day’s practice.  Maintain this same philosophy for post-race/meet situations as well.

 

Throughout the season as practices become more advanced these abbreviations will help you understand the workouts a little better:

Codes –

best avg – best effort over entire set,  Bk – Backstroke, Br – Breaststroke, build – increase speed over designated distance, C –cycle,  Catch-up  – overlapping stroke, dol – dolphin kick, DPK -Distance per kick, DPS -Distance per stroke, Dr –Drill, Fl- Butterfly,     fltr – flutter kick, Fr-Freestyle, K –Kick, K-6’s –(K 6 times on alternate sides),  R/L K-6’s (K 6 times for each arm pull remaining on same side for designated distance), P1- Pull w/ pullbouy, P2 – Pull w/ pullbouy and paddles, ri – rest interval,  R/L – right/left, RP Race Pace, Sc – Sculling,  Sw- Swim, LT- lactate tolerance, WU/WD warm-up/warm-down.


  Jim Peterfish is the Swimming Director of the NCASB and member of USA Swimming National Disability Committee. Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

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2017 NCASB Wrestling & Cheerleading Competition Results

Congratulations to all of the Coaches and Athletes that participated in the 2016-17 NCASB Wrestling and Cheerleading Conference Meet that took place in Kentucky on January 27-28th, 2017. We had 11 out of 12 schools represented with almost 250 athletes, coaches, volunteers and spectators in attendance. It was an outstanding two days of competition! Listed below are team and individual results for both Wrestling and Cheerleading.

January 27, 2017: Cheerleading

Team Cheer Competition:

  1. Arkansas- 211 pts.
  2. Illinois- 200.5 pts.
  3. Tennessee- 191 pts.
  4. Wisconsin- 185.5 pts.
  5. Missouri- 179 pts.
  6. Kentucky- 176 pts.
  7. Ohio- 174 pts.
  8. Kansas- 161.5 pts.
  9. Indiana- 152 pts.

Outstanding Cheerleader Competition:

  1. Tennessee- 204 pts.
  2. Ohio 199 pts.
  3. Wisconsin- 186.5 pts.
  4. Kentucky- 179 pts.
  5. Missouri- 171.5 pts.

January 28, 2017: Wrestling:

Team Competition:

  1. Indiana- 171 pts.
  2. Arkansas- 141.5 pts.
  3. Ohio- 110.5 pts.
  4. Tennessee- 80 pts.
  5. Iowa- 52 pts.
  6. Wisconsin- 41 pts.
  7. Kentucky- 37 pts.
  8. Kansas- 34.5 pts.
  9. Minnesota- 21 pts.
  10. Illinois- 8 pts.
  11. Missouri 5 pts.

Individual:

95 lbs: Kyle Beasley (WCBVI) defeated Gabe Lewis (KSSB) by a pin in 0:25

106lbs: Awat Rage (OSSB) defeated Alex Crawford (OSSB) by a score of 8-5

112lbs: Caiden Hooks (OSSB) defeated Braxton Twitty (ISBVI) by a pin in 1:36

126lbs: Chris Avila (ISBVI) defeated Alex Gillaspie (IBSSS) by  a score of 10-0

145lbs: Corion White (ISBVI) defeated Avery Mayberry (TSB) by a score of 13-8

152lbs: Jordan Williams-Smith (ASB) defeated Jacob Hack (KSB) by a technical fall in 5:30

160lbs: Antonio Hardy (ISBVI) defeated Derieus Ellis (ASB) by a pin in 2:55

171lbs: Keenan Farr (ISBVI) defeated Cody Hull (ASB) by a score of 6-4

181lbs: Mianthony Jones (ASB) defeated Marcus Pierce (ASB)

285lbs: Thomas Alfred (OSSB) defeated Craig Heggie

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2014 Track and Field Championships

The NCASB would like to say Thank You to the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired for hosting the 2014 Track and Field Championships.  Below are the final team results from that meet.

Female Results
1. Tennessee – 192 pts
2. Missouri – 180 pts
3. Indiana – 127 pts
4. Illinois – 70 pts
5. Kentucky – 32 pts
6.. Arkansas – 28 pts
7. Ohio – 28 pts
Iowa – 28 pts
8. Minnesota – 18 pts
9. Wisconsin – 1 pt
Male Results
1. Tennessee – 199 pts
2. Indiana – 178 pts
3. Missouri – 134 pts
4. Kentucky – 107 pts
5. Ohio – 54 pts
6.. Arkansas – 35 pts
7. Kansas – 12 pts
8. Minnesota – 7 pts
9. Iowa – 6 pts
10. Wisonsin – 1 pt
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