2021 -2022

NCASB Conference Championship Calendar

Track/Field

October 1 – 3, 2021 NCASB Track and Field Conference @ Tennessee

Goal Ball

November 5 – 7, 2021 NCASB Goal ball Conference @Missouri

November 7 – 9, 2021 AD meeting St. Louis, Missouri

Wrestling /Cheerleading

January 21 – 23, 2022 NCASB Wrestling/Cheerleading Conference @ Kentucky

Swim/Forensics

April 29 – May 1. 2022 NCASB Swim/Forensics Conference @ Illinois

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NCASB swim/forensics Conference in Tennessee has been canceled for the 2020 school year

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2018 Goalball Brackets

BOYS Goalball ’18 brackets

GIRLS Goalball ’18 brackets coming soon!

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2018 Track Conference Results

NCASB 2018 track & field results

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2018 Swim Conference Results and Scores

2018 Conference Meet Results and Score

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2018 Conference Champ Heat Sheet

2018 Conference Champ Heat Sheet

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1803 NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER

1803 NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER

NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER 

2018 – Edition 3

Quick Notes:

Elligibility is due now – please forward to Alison Brewer-Wood and me.  I only need swimming sent to me.

Sonka Award nominees and meet entries will be due on April 17th (10 days prior to the meet.)  If you have individual or relay time updates I can take those after the 17th but, no change of events.  

 

Q & A

Coach Paul Ehresman <ehrestiltskin@yahoo.com> wrote:

I’ve got some totally blind rookies/non-swimmers this year, and I am going to do the dryland streamlining with them to help with that skill. 

Also, we have had good luck the last 2 years with those “Safelanes.”  So far this year, we have had enough boppers to guard against injury at both ends during practices, but we still have the Safelanes available for the times we will need them.

  • Paul Ehresman Coach, MSB

Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

If you have questions – ask!  If you have input – share!

Jim

Rules:   The NF rule book is available for download at www.nfhs.org/ebooks  code: SWRB18.

 

Tip of the Week

In early February I was out in Colorado Springs at the Olympic Training Center at a Disability Swimming Workshop co-hosted by US Paralympics and USA Swimming. My role was very minor as a member of the National Disability Committee, yet especially enjoyable being able to spend time with the Resident Paralympic Team during a couple of their training sessions. Tharon Drake, S-11 (totally blind) double Silver Medalist in Rio, is a fellow committee member and Resident Team member. Tharon was on a few of the USABA World Youth Games teams that I coached and came to Columbus in the summer of 2015 to train with my club. The top picture is his tapper the bottom is a variety of others.  Don’t limit yourself to just a white cane and a tennis ball

Tapper that belongs Paralympian Tharon Drake.  It is almost 10 feet tall.

Tapper that belongs Paralympian Tharon Drake. It is almost 10 feet tall.

A variety of tappers of much short length and style to that of Tharon's

A variety of tappers of much short length and style to that of Tharon’s.

Stroke Drill(s) of the WeekDouble Tap Freestyle

                Double Tap Freestyle can be done as a one-arm drill or alternating with the “catch-up” drill.   The intent is to promote a high elbow position and full extension of the arm out in front.  The one-arm version is where to start.  Beginning from a streamline kick position the swimmer takes a single arm pull under the body down to the hip, as the same side hip rolls upward and out of the way a full propulsive movement the swimmer hesitates momentarily on their opposite side while kicking.  During the recovery the swimmer elevates the elbow, keeping the hand in close to their body.  As the hand moves forward, they “tap” the head (1), and then “tap” (2) the outstretched opposite hand.  In the one-arm scenario keep using the same hand, alternate for the catch-up drill. 

 

Dryland Exercise of the Week – Leg lift progression

Here is a leg lift progression that you can add into your dryland or as part of a circuit. 

It begins with the athlete on their back.

  • Single leg tuck – alternate R/L legs bringing the knee to the chest.
  • Single (straight) leg lift – Alt R/L lifting the foot as high as possible.
  • Bicycle legs – alternate R/L legs bringing the knee of one leg to the chest while simultaneously extending the opposite leg to full extension.
  • Dbl tuck – bring the knees of both legs to the chest and extend simultaneously.
  • Flutter Kick – while keeping legs straight alternate moving legs up and down approx. 10-12 inches.
  • Giant flutter – same as Flutter kick except the legs move to 90 degrees with each uplift.
  • Dbl leg lift – lift both legs simultaneously to 90 degrees and return to within inches of the deck.
  • Rainbow – with both legs at 90 degrees sweep them back and forth in a “rainbow” fashion.
  • Figure 8 rainbow – variation where the legs move in a “figure 8” fashion as they sweep side to side in a rainbow pattern.

 

 

 

Nutrition – Nutrition: A Coaching Perspective

Swim Coach and Registered Dietician Nutritionist, Rachel Rubatt, MA, RDN, LD, gave a complete presentation full of information and resources back in October.  Here is a link to that presentation. 

https://usaswimming.org/docs/default-source/camps/national-select-camp/home-coach-presentations/nutrition–a-coaching-perspective–rachel-rubatt.pdf

 

Weekly Workout (Abbreviations are listed at bottom of this page)

This ‘Weekly Workout’ comes from swimmer Grace Johanns from Iowa Braille School.  Grace owns eight individual event conference records and one relay.  I can’t think of a better athlete to highlight as the first contributor to this section of the newsletter.   Grace not only shares her favorite sets and drills, but, adds her personal and candid comments.  Her suggestions could easily fill a week or more of workouts.  Thanks to Grace and congratulations to Coach Schellhorn and Grace’s public school and club coaches for developing such a well-rounded student-athlete.   

Hello Mr. Peterfish,

Here is a workout that I do:

Warm Up:

Depending on how much I want to warm up I change what I am doing. Here are some different sets that I do:

 8X75 KPS on the 1:45 or 2:00 Time can always be adjusted depending on what each swimmer can do.  (Kick, Pull, Swim) Odds all free, Evens do IM Order. 25 fly kick, 25 back pull, 25 free swim then the next odd the swimmer would start with back, then breast, and end with fly. I change the order of the IM on each evens so that way I am doing KPS for all the strokes. If it’s easier to just do the evens in IMO every time that is okay too.

 

4X200 KPS and IM. 3:30 or 4:00 This can also be done in 4X100 as well. Sometimes my coaches make us do the 200 kick on our back in IMO and I find that to be tiring. It forces me to engage my core more, especially kicking fly on my back. Kicking breast while on my back feels interesting and is definitely more of a challenge for me.

 

10 minute swim then team stretching afterwards. This was my high school warm up. I typically did a 500-600 depending on the day, usually a 500. I enjoyed doing stretching as a team because it allowed for us to bond and talk to one another. It is also a good opportunity for an individual to take on a leadership position and lead the stretches. Any drills, for any stroke, snorkels, or other equipment can be used during any part of the warmup.

 

 Main Set:

Here is a variety of different sets that I have swam as the main set of a workout:

 

10×100 free on the 1:30. I am a sprinter and I dread having to swim this set because it tires me out quickly and usually I do not get a lot of rest as I will probably finish at around a 1:15 to 1:20 give or take. I think that this set builds my endurance and I can focus on sprinting and how I would swim the 100 free in a race.

 

10×100 alternating between free and IM. Odds IM Evens free, however, this can be interchanged. 2:00 on this set.

 

10X50 on the 1:00. This can be done off the blocks each time or starting in the water. If my coaches wanted to use this an entire practice we would do 50X50 on the 50 or 1:00. We only did this once or twice all season as it is exhausting and I don’t know a swimmer that looks forward to it 🙂

 

3×200 Free, IM, or Choice 3;30 (Sometimes we do this 2 times through)

 

8X75 IMO, free can be used here as well. 1:15 or 1:30, 2:00

 

12×25 sprint 30 seconds

 

12×25 underwater kick. Alternate between stomach and back. The goal is to try and make it the entire 25 underwater, but if one needs to surface to take a quick breath that is okay just have them go back beneath the water after thy have taken their breath

 

Cool Down:

After any workout I think a cool down is necessary, and I think it is equally as important to do a cool down swim at the end of a hard, intense workout, even if you are exhausted. I like to cool down and allow my body to relax from all the strain that I have just exhibited upon it.

I have never done tremendously long cool downs but here are some sets that could be done:

 

50, 75, 100, 200 swimming free, long and strong. Just because it is a cool down does not mean that a swimmer should lose focus or form (I am guilty of this sometimes). If a swimmer wants to do stroke I don’t see why not, but usually everyone does free. I always do as freestyle is my main stroke. Maybe stretching afterword’s. I haven’t really done this a lot until maybe a day or so after a hard workout but I don’t think stretching afterwards would be unbeneficial.

 

Drills that I enjoy: Here are just a few of my favorite drills! These can also be incorporated into the main set if you want to do some separate sets specifically with drills.

 

4×50 drill – This set can be lengthened or shortened depending on what one wants to achieve. Freestyle Drills

Catchup

Kicking on your side with one arm extended and the other at your side. You can alternate between sides for example 8 kicks on the right side,> pull/roll  free to the left 8 kicks, pull free, rotate again.

 Blackline Drill- this is a drill that one of my coaches made for me in middle school. I have a tendency to keep my head too far up when I am swimming freestyle so I am getting a slight resistance and drag from the water.  My goal with this drill is to look down at the black line when I am swimming and not to let the water go past my forehead or goggles. I should be looking perfectly at the black line and on top of the water. Depending on the vision of a swimmer this may not be beneficial, but it is one that I found to work well for me.

 

Other things I do to help me in swimming:

Backstroke- In swimming from the moment I started at age 10, I was always told to follow the lines on the ceiling when I swam backstroke. Following the lines keeps a swimmer in the middle of the lane, which is the fastest route to take, and it keeps them straight. I cannot see the lines on the celling well enough to follow them, sometimes depending on the pool, I can’t even see them. In order to keep myself straight in backstroke, so I don’t weave throughout the lane while I swim, which gains time, I shoulder up to one side of the lane line and will stay on that side the entire race. I make sure that I do not move my hand under the lane line when I pull as that would get me DQ’d, so I keep a distance enough away from it, but still close. I can see the lane line and I swim close to it. This may be hard for some to gage the perfect distance away from the lane line. For me it has been very helpful when I swim backstroke

 Flipturns:

 In a race I always lose time on the wall. Due to my lack and absence of depth perception it is hard for me to gage my distance from the wall and find the perfect and ideal moment to flip. I always lose time and often other swimmers can catch me on my turns as they are slightly slower than theirs. I try to look at the “T” and then flip right there or take one stroke after that. I also count my strokes so that way I know how many I need to take.

 

I hope that this was helpful and made sense!

Grace Johanns

Very much so, Grace – thank you! JP

 

Last Lap  

Thanks to Coach Ehresman and Athlete Grace Johanns for contributing to this newsletter. 

Email me at youthletics@columbus.rr.com, or text me at 740-816-1368.  With your contributions or questions. 

Don’t forget Eligibility, entries and  Sonka Award nominees are all due soon.   

 

Each edition of this newsletter along with last year’s series will be posted to the new NCASB website.   If you want to add any staff members to this email list, please, let me know. 

 

Throughout the season as practices become more advanced these abbreviations will help you understand the workouts a little better:

Codes –

best avg – best effort over entire set,  Bk – Backstroke, Br – Breaststroke, build – increase speed over designated distance, C –cycle,  Catch-up  – overlapping stroke, dol – dolphin kick, DPK -Distance per kick, DPS -Distance per stroke, Dr –Drill, Fl- Butterfly,     fltr – flutter kick, Fr-Freestyle, K –Kick, K-6’s –(K 6 times on alternate sides),  R/L K-6’s (K 6 times for each arm pull remaining on same side for designated distance), P1- Pull w/ pullbouy, P2 – Pull w/ pullbouy and paddles, ri – rest interval,  R/L – right/left, RP Race Pace, Sc – Sculling,  Sw- Swim, LT- lactate tolerance, WU/WD warm-up/warm-down.      

 

Jim Peterfish is the Swimming Director of the NCASB and member of USA Swimming National Disability Committee. Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com    

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1802 NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER

1802 NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER

NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER 

2018 – Edition 2

Q & A

Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

If you have questions – ask!  If you have input – share!

Ideas for sharing:

Anything that you do in your program – doesn’t have to be grandiose – the practical things make the biggest difference.

Any question you’ve asked a colleague and didn’t find the answer.  Maybe someone has the answer.

Any question you’ve asked a colleague and DID find the answer.  Maybe someone has the same question.

I would really like to share any athlete’s favorite sets or full practices.  Anything they see as valuable to their preparation or just have fun doing.  Let them share.

Jim

Rules:   The NF rule book is available for download at www.nfhs.org/ebooks  code: SWRB18.

 

Tip of the Week

In the first newsletter last year (1701) I reviewed the more common pieces of equipment that many programs use and discussed their pros and cons.  This week I would like to share a few pieces of safety equipment.  You may be familiar with one of these as it’s been out a while now, however the second one is brilliant and unfortunately not available until near the end of our season.

The first is the “Safelane.”  It’s a very simple protective tube that you attach from one lane line to the next at the gutter edge that protects the swimmers if they crash the wall.  It’s relatively unobtrusive allowing the swimmers to swim in and out of walls.  Set up involves adding water and air to the tube, it requires little maintenance and is easy to store when not in use.  The cost can be prohibitive if covering all lanes at both ends.  At $139 per unit, a four lane pool would cost $1100 to protect each wall.  However, if you have some high risk athletes and you’re limited on tappers perhaps one unit with a tapper at the other end could make practices safer and more efficient.  www.safelaneswimming.com

This second piece of safety equipment is something perhaps we’ve all thought about and finally someone took the initiative to create it!  Safety Swim Caps!  Hammerhead Swim Cap designers have positioned a protective honeycomb form at the top of the swim cap that drastically reduces the impact pressure of any head-on collision.  Since the swimmer is wearing the cap the protection goes where ever they go. Thus, collisions with other swimmers anywhere during the length of a swim, or the end wall have reduced effect.  The price is $34 per cap which is pricey compared to a regular cap, however, when considering the safety aspect it’s not bad.  They offer bulk discounts, but the biggest con is pre-sale orders won’t be filled until sometime in April.  I’ve written to the company to see if I could get a demo cap in exchange for promoting it with all of you, however, received no response.  I like the product too much to hold off sharing it until they send me one.  I’ll update you if I do get my hands on one.  Check this product out at their website.  www.hammerheadswimcaps.com

 

Stroke Drill(s) of the WeekStreamline!

It’s so simple, yet so important.  Once a swimmer can get air exchange the next most important thing to teach them is streamlining.

“Free speed” is what I call it, here is how I describe it;  “Get your body into a long and tight position as quickly as possible as you leave the wall.  Hold that position until you feel yourself slowing down.”

Here is how I teach it:  Planks are a great way to teach streamlining.  The swimmer starts in a lying position on his/her back.  Legs should be straight and together with toes pointed.  Arms are extended overhead with elbows straight, hands stacked one upon the other with fingers aligned.  From this position they stretch themselves as though they are attempting to lengthen both their arms and legs simultaneously while trying to push their ears up the side of their head with their shoulders.

Progress to having them bridge from heels to shoulders maintaining the stretch.

The next phase is to roll them over on their stomachs – assume the same body position as described earlier and then extend their lower back slightly lifting the shoulders and arms off the floor.  Repeat this position several times with a few seconds rest between stretches.

In the water have them push off the wall from a side (“Ready”) position and quickly assume the streamline position and glide for distance.  Challenge them to get off the wall quickly, maintaining a good streamline and measure accuracy by how far off the black line they wander as they move off the wall.

This is a great drill to fill any down time between sets or at the end of warm-up.  It’s also a skill they have the opportunity to improve every time they leave the wall.

 

Dryland Exercise of the Week – Flexibility –Stretching Dos and Don’ts

Our Drill of the Week could double as the Dryland Exercise of the Week.  Stretching is an important part of any exercise regimen.  The type of stretching exercise you do, how you do them and when you do them are the important elements of their effectiveness.  Dynamic (active) stretching before you move (exercise) and static (stationary) stretching after (when you stop) exercise is a good rule of thumb to follow.  Here is a link with great pictures of dos and don’ts of stretching for swimming.  www.usmsswimmer.com/201001/swimmer_stretching.pdf

 

Nutrition – Sound Advice

I’m sure whether they’re eating at school, or at home your swimmers make choices each meal.  The difficult part is getting them to make the right choice.  If weight gain (or loss) is a concern you have for one, or more of your athletes consider having them keep a diary of their meals.  It’s a great way to monitor their diets and you may find they have some fundamental challenges that are difficult to overcome.   Providing them a list of several days’ worth of healthy meal choices is one way to get them eating better.

Here’s a sample of balanced meals for an active child. 

Breakfast:  low-fat yogurt with some granola and a banana, or whole-grain cereal and low-fat milk with sliced strawberries.

Lunch:  bean burritos with low-fat cheese, lettuce, and tomatoes or a turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread and fruit.

Dinner:  grilled chicken breasts with steamed rice and vegetables, or pasta with red sauce and lean ground beef, along with a salad.

Snacks:  pretzels, raisins, crackers, string cheese, vegetables, or fruit.

 

 

Weekly Workout (Abbreviations are listed at bottom of this page)

Modify this workout (distances, cycles, etc.), to meet the needs and abilities of your swimmers.  Taking time to teach each drill is important.  This workout assumes knowledge of the drills included and fits the season plan I outlined in the first newsletter.

Conditioning/Stroke Development Phase

WU      50 Sw – 50 K – 50 Dr (x2)  (drill stroke of emphasis of the day) Suggestion: Free K-6’s R/L Arm K-6’s

Streamline drill – 6 -6’s (from ready position streamline a minimum of 6 yards 6 times while holding perfect positon) .  Swimmers may walk or swim back in an adjacent lane to keep the flow one way.

Kick/Swim – 25 K/25 Sw, 50 K/50 Sw, 75 K/75 Sw, 100 K/100 Sw  ri = :10/per 25

Dr Free – 4 x  (Side K – K-6’s –  R/L Arm K-6’s – Sw)

Sw Fr (progressive overload)   50 – 100 – 150 – 200….  Continue to increase distance – 20 min.

Combo Drill (wet and dry) Begin with five (5) block push-ups (feet on deck, hands on edge of starting block),  dive start (wall or block), streamline kick to mid pool fast, jumping bobs to end wall, press-out to front support (hands on deck, elbows straight, feet off bottom) on side of pool – hold for 10 count, exit pool, do five (5) 4- Ct squat thrust (burpee), high knee steps back to starting point.  Repeat for 10 minutes.

WD         Sw 200 +/-                                                                                                            Appr. 2000 yds

 

Last Lap  

I can’t encourage you enough to share your thoughts and ideas with other coaches within the conference.  Some coaches feel giving away their “secrets” give their opponents an advantage.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  The more you share, the more you gain.  I’ve found it an art to steal as many ideas from other coaches as possible.  To be honest, they actually offer it up and I doubt I’ve ever used it the same way they did.  It’s very difficult to take what another coach does and just retrofit it into your own program.  I’ve always modified what I’ve heard or read to fit my plan.  And rarely, do I implement something new once the season begins, so in most cases anything you share won’t be used until next season.  By modifying ideas they become unique to your needs.  Sharing allows your idea to spawn into something another coach can modify to meet their style of coaching.

Perhaps you don’t have time to sit down and write out a lengthy explanation of what you’re doing.  Share, or, ask questions of a colleague at practice, or a meet.  If you observe a particular swimmer performing something exceptional, ask their coach what they’re doing with them to promote that skill.  When a question or idea comes to mind write it down on the heat sheet, or scrap paper and take a picture of it, then text it to me.

Email me at youthletics@columbus.rr.com, or text me at 740-816-1368.

Each edition of this newsletter along with last year’s series will be posted to the new NCASB website.   If you want to add any staff members to this email list, please, let me know.

 

Throughout the season as practices become more advanced these abbreviations will help you understand the workouts a little better:

Codes –

best avg – best effort over entire set,  Bk – Backstroke, Br – Breaststroke, build – increase speed over designated distance, C –cycle,  Catch-up  – overlapping stroke, dol – dolphin kick, DPK -Distance per kick, DPS -Distance per stroke, Dr –Drill, Fl- Butterfly,     fltr – flutter kick, Fr-Freestyle, K –Kick, K-6’s –(K 6 times on alternate sides),  R/L K-6’s (K 6 times for each arm pull remaining on same side for designated distance), P1- Pull w/ pullbouy, P2 – Pull w/ pullbouy and paddles, ri – rest interval,  R/L – right/left, RP Race Pace, Sc – Sculling,  Sw- Swim, LT- lactate tolerance, WU/WD warm-up/warm-down.

 

Jim Peterfish is the Swimming Director of the NCASB and member of USA Swimming National Disability Committee. Please contribute to the Q & A and direct any suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

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1801 NCASB Swim Coaches Newsletter

1801 NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER

NCASB SWIM COACHES NEWSLETTER

2018 – Edition 1

This being the first of this season’s newsletter I want to emphasize that your input is strongly encouraged.  Contributions to the content of this publication increase its value immensely.  Collectively the small and perhaps routine things that each of you do in your programs can significantly influence the success other coaches have with their individual swimmers. Please, make this a group project and let me be the vehicle that distributes the information.

I thought a new twist to this year’s newsletter would be to share athlete’s favorite sets or things that they see as valuable to their preparation.   If you have an athlete or two that you would like to solicit for their favorite practice or, supply me their name and email address I’ll contact them directly.

If you have questions – ask!  If you have input – share!

All the best to a great season!

Jim

 

Rules:

Changes for the 2017-18 season. Source NFHS Swimming and Diving Rules Book 2017-18.

Rule changes that affect swimmers for this season.

2-7-6, 3-4  Lap Counters – lap counters are now permitted to count the competitors laps by changing the number to the next higher or lower number, as the competitor makes each turn at the starting end.

3-3-2a Uniforms – consistent language has been established for all NFHS sports that describe what information is permitted on the uniform.  A competitor’s name, school name, school nickname and/or the school logo can be placed on the uniform, which consists of the suit and cap.

3-6, 4-1-8 Conduct – Rule 3 was reorganized to provide consistency and clarity for penalties associated with various competitor and/or meet personnel conduct.  In addition, the rule pertaining to language regarding the prohibition of an officials tobacco use at the competition site was moved from Rule 3-6 to Rule 4-1-8.

4-6-1, 8-3-5c       Relay Events – On relays, the second, third and fourth swimmers are prohibited from taking off from the top of the starting block wedge.  Competitors must have at least one foot in contact with the starting platform in front of the starting block wedge during take-off.  The responsibility to observe this aspect of this takeoff falls under the relay takeoff judge’s jurisdiction, and does not require dual confirmation.

4-6-4  Relay Takeoff Judges – Dual confirmation for relay takeoffs is now required for all championship meets.  Dual confirmation can be accomplished either (a) by two side judges observing the entire field, or, (b) by a combination of side and lane judges.  The referee and the starter may serve as relay takeoff judges as well.

The rule book app is available for download at www.nfhs.org/erules Search “NFHS Rules App” on iTunes or Google Play.

Coaches are responsible for knowing the NCASB exceptions to NFHS rules posted on the website ncasb.org.

 

Season Planning

This week’s Newsletter will focus on season planning.  You all routinely create lesson plans and IEP’s and can probably do so in your sleep.   How about planning your season?  This particular plan is based on 12 weeks, but, gives you the flexibility to adapt to the number of weeks, days and hours you have available.

A season plan is your team’s roadmap to success.  Having an idea of what you want to accomplish, assessing what are reasonable goals for your team/individuals and then creating a plan to make it happen can motivate you and the team in ways you never thought existed.  Explaining the plan to the swimmers allows them the opportunity to buy into the season.  If they understand you’re providing the plan, yet, they’re responsible for their own success you’re well on you way to a great season!

12 Week Season Training Plan

Phase 1 – Conditioning/Stroke Development – 3-4 weeks

Regardless of the individuals experience with swimming they have a need for adapting to the new season and a refresher in the basics of each stroke.  Here is where you will introduce new drills and begin their adjustment to the physical demands of training.  Emphasis should begin with basic body/head positions, evolving into kicking drills and then arm and timing drills.  Training should be  progressive aerobic exercise that includes increasing amounts of time (not necessarily distance) spent in continuous swimming.

Drills: Body and Head positions, streamlining (fingers to toes) and breathing drills.  Short distance (widths) repetitive with little rest, but, perfect technique is required.

Training:  Aerobic – progressively increasing time exercising in the water.   Kicking drills are essential at this time.  To the athletes nothing feels exceptionally good so you might as well stress the legs.

Intervals of 25 to 50 yd kicks with less than :10 rest, increasing to up to 30 minutes of intervals up to 200 yds at a time with no more than :10 rest per minute of exercise.

Individual and Team Goals should be determined during this phase.

 

Phase 2 Training   – 4 weeks

By week 5 you should have had time to assess group and individuals abilities determining appropriate intervals for them.  This is where you can be creative and present various distances and rest to work ratios.  Combine short distance (SD) with long rest interval (ri), moderate/middle distance (MD) with moderate rest interval, and long distance (LD) with short rest interval.  Examples below.

SD:Lri  25-50 yds w/ :45-2:00ri.

MD:Mri  100-200 yds w/ 1:00-3:00ri

LD:Sri  300 – 1000 yds w/ ri of max of :10ri per minute of swimming

Tracking these groups will allow you to progressively overload them on a weekly basis.  You should aim for approximately 10% increase in distance or time each week.  Capacity (test) sets done weekly give you a great view of their adaptation to the training.

Capacity Set – 6 x 50 yds – each swimmer has a specific goal/target time per 50 and a cycle typically around plus :20 seconds.   (6 x 50 yds – target :45 cycle 1:05).   You record all 50’s that they swim at or faster than :45.  Once they make all 6 you decrease the target time and cycle incrementally.

Consideration needs to be given to how much practice time and you have daily but these types of test sets are very valuable when it comes to assessing the swimmers adaptation to training.

Drills: Stroke emphasis during this phase should be distance per stroke (DPS), stroke rate (SR) and stroke count (SC).  By this point you should know which drills are working best or needed most for each of the strokes.  Concentrate on doing a few drills very well rather than an assortment that you have to continually correct.

Training:  Mix of anaerobic and aerobic – progressively overload.  It’s ok for them to come to the next practice feeling a little sore from yesterday’s practice.

Individual and Team Goals should be reviewed regularly during this phase to remind the swimmers why extra effort is important now.

 

Phase 3 – Competitive 3- 4 weeks

Although you may have already had a meet or two prior to entering this phase, this is when specificity in your training becomes important.  On a regular basis, practices look more and more like repetitive races.  Realizing that in the NCASB conference swimmers may swim three individual events and another two relays.  The distances may span 50 yards up to 500 yards.  You’ll probably use one of two different strategies: train for the longer of their races, or, rank their individual events one to three in order of preference, or, expected success.  Once you’ve decided which works best in your team planning tailor your Race Pace (RP) sets to those events.

Race Pace (RP) sets attempt to mimic the race conditions the swimmer will encounter and allow them to swim at speeds very close, if not faster, than in actual competition.  Just as in a meet swimmers will have significant recovery time so should these sets be on long rest intervals (Lri).  Swims should be broken with rest to allow maximum speed during each part.

Speed (SP) sets are very important but if done properly take a little bit of time compared to the amount of yardage you gain.  Swimming faster than RP is critical, but will be done so in shorter than race distance.  Speedplay or variable speed sets are effective.

Here are some examples of RP sets:

Event – 200 Free

3 x 200 C 8:00   1) Broken at 100/:15ri, 2) Broken at 50 & 100 for :15ri each, 3) Broken at every 50 for :15ri each.  Subtract the cumulative ri time from the total time and this time should be as close to their goal time as possible.

8 x 50 C 2:00   Each 50 must be faster than the average of the last three 50s of their goal 200 Fr

You may add in a couple of sprints at the 150 mark to mimic what they may be feeling on the end of a race 200.  Easy swimming during or in addition to the cycle will help recovery between swims.

Here are some examples of SP sets:

8 x 25 C 2:00 – All done very fast – from a start is good or mid-pool 25’s allows them to incorporate their turn technique.

Speedplay – continuous 300 alternating 25 fast with 50 moderate.

Variable Speed Set  – 2 x 4 x 25yd  C 1:00 with an extra 1:00ri /set.  Each set of 4 x 25’s = 1) Easy, 2) Easy/Fast x 12.5’s, 3) Fast/Easy x 12.5, 4) Fast   These sets can be done at distances of 50 yds for your 200 swimmers and 100’s for your 500 swimmers.

Adjust these sets according to event distance and add them in periodically throughout this phase.  You should see them getting closer and closer to goal times as this competitive phase continuous.

 

Phase 4 – Rest 1-2 weeks

In most cases your final week or two will be time to rest.  You will determine how long they need to rest (taper) for the upcoming championship.  The basic rule of thumb in resting is to not allow one practice to effect the next.  In other words you don’t want to do anything that will make them sore or overly tired.  Fast swimming is ok, but should be followed up with plenty of recovery exercise.  Warm up as you would for the meet and rehearse all parts of their races; starts, turns, finishes and pacing.  Extra work on relay exchanges and swimmer order are important during this time.

You’ll want to present another reminder of team and individual goals to get them excited about the opportunity to compete well at the championship meet and focus on being smart in their behavior away from the pool.

 

Last Lap   

If you have questions regarding any aspect of the sport or topics for this season I can address as Swimming Director, I’ll be glad to take a stab at answering and/or research to provide the best possible response.  Email me at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

This edition along with last year’s series of newsletters will be posted to the new NCASB website.   If you want to add any staff members to this email list, please, let me know.

 

Weekly Workout (Abbreviations are listed at bottom of this page)

In subsequent editions I’ll add my workouts or submitted workouts to the mix.  These are abbreviations I use that will help you understand the workouts a little better:

Codes –

best avg – best effort over entire set,  Bk – Backstroke, Br – Breaststroke, build – increase speed over designated distance, C –cycle,  Catch-up  – overlapping stroke, dol – dolphin kick, DPK -Distance per kick, DPS -Distance per stroke, Dr –Drill, Fl- Butterfly,     fltr – flutter kick, Fr-Freestyle, K –Kick, K-6’s –(K 6 times on alternate sides),  R/L K-6’s (K 6 times for each arm pull remaining on same side for designated distance), P1- Pull w/ pullbouy, P2 – Pull w/ pullbouy and paddles, ri – rest interval,  R/L – right/left, RP Race Pace, Sc – Sculling,  Sw- Swim, LT- lactate tolerance, WU/WD warm-up/warm-down.

 

Jim Peterfish is the Swimming Director of the NCASB and member of USA Swimming National Disability Committee. Please direct  any questions, suggestions or comments to Coach Jim at youthletics@columbus.rr.com

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2017 NCASB Swim Championship results

Results from the 2017 NCASB Swim Championship

NCASB Swim Championship results 2017

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